How would Jesus Vote?

I posted the article below in 2017 when a general election was called. Now we face another general election and the same question applies.

With a general election looming in the United Kingdom I am asking the question, “How, as a follower of Jesus should I vote?”  Does Jesus give us any clue how we should act in a democratic age?  Jesus said a lot about how we should order our lives, but very little about how we should go about choosing a politician or political party to rule over us.  But if we want to be true to following Jesus we need to look carefully at his life and words and see if we can glean some clues.

  • What are the cultural differences between Jesus’ day and today?
  • Was Jesus a nationalist?
  • Was Jesus a socialist?
  • Did Jesus believe in a free market?
  • How would Jesus vote?

Empire and Democracy

When Jesus was on earth, the counties around the Mediterranean were firmly in the grip of the Roman Empire.  This was an absolute dictatorship and the people of Judea had no say at all in how they were governed.  There was no possibility of them choosing a new government or in overthrowing their oppressors.  Today, most countries have some sort of democracy in which the people can decide what sort of policies they want and choose leaders to govern them.  It is not easy to say how Jesus would have instructed his followers to deal with the situation we find ourselves in today.

Nationalism

There was a group of freedom fighters or terrorists, (according to your point of view,) called the Zealots but their resistance ultimately resulted in a crushing defeat by Rome (AD70).  Jesus realised that this approach would sooner or later result in disaster.  Much of the prophecy in Matthew 24 refers to the destruction of Jerusalem as the inevitable result of rebellion against the Roman Empire.  Many were looking to a “Messiah” to free them from the shackles of Empire but Jesus made it clear that he was not that type of messiah.  Certainly Jesus came to usher in a new Kingdom, but this was not a man-made kingdom but the Kingdom of God. The good news was that this Kingdom is open to all and offers a completely different way than nationalism, socialism, democracy and empire. We must conclude that Jesus was not a nationalist.

Capitalism

In the parable of the talents Jesus talked about the merits of trading and depositing money in a bank to earn interest.  He talked, again in a parable,  about employers having the right to pay employees according to their own rules and the workers having to accept that.

But Jesus, living in the culture of the day, drew out examples to make spiritual points. We must be careful not to infer that he put his stamp of approval on the capitalist society of the day.  Indeed, in another parable, he warned the complacency of building bigger barns to store crops.

In the Sermon on the Mount he said,

“Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moths and vermin destroy, and where thieves break in and steal.
But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where moths and vermin do not destroy, and where thieves do not break in and steal.
For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. (Matthew 6:19-21 NIV)

We cannot conclude that Jesus supported capitalism, or was anti-capitalist. Indeed he showed us another way, the way of love.

Communism

The only link that I can find between Jesus and Communism is the fact that he and his disciples held a common purse.  Jesus’ attitude towards money carried on after Pentecost when the new disciples sold possessions so that needs could be met.  The apostle Paul, in raising support for the poor in Jerusalem, said:

Our desire is not that others might be relieved while you are hard pressed, but that there might be equality.
At the present time your plenty will supply what they need, so that in turn their plenty will supply what you need.
The goal is equality, as it is written: “The one who gathered much did not have too much, and the one who gathered little did not have too little.” (2 Corinthians 8:13-15 NIV)

Jesus’ teaching supported meeting needs and Paul expressed this as equality but this was a long way from communism supported by Karl Marx.

Socialism

Any one looking for evidence that Jesus was a socialist is bound to be disappointed. You only have to look at the examples he put in his parables to see he was no idealist socialist. Socialism tries to implement caring for the disadvantaged by legislation.  But Jesus talked about loving our neighbour and even loving our enemy and there is no way these things can be forced on a society. So whereas socialism and the teachings of Jesus have many common ideals, it is all about the individual level, not the state level.

Alternative way

Jesus came to usher in a new kingdom. Jesus called this the kingdom of heaven and he asked us to pray that  this kingdom would come to this world where we are living.  We can be a part of this kingdom but cannot vote for it! It is a kingdom based on love. Jesus said we must love our neighbour and even love our enemy.

Love your neighbour

For the whole Law is summarized in a single statement: “You must love your neighbor as yourself.” (Galatians 5:14 NIV)

Love your enemy

You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’
But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you,
that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. (Matthew 5:43-45 NIV)

How, then should I vote?

In a democracy I have a duty to help choose a government. As a follower of Jesus Christ, I cannot impose my views on a majority.  As a voter I can only have a tiny effect on the result.  We cannot vote directly for God’s kingdom and no political party comes close to following the principals of his kingdom. I can only ask, “What if the whole population were to follow the teachings of Jesus.  How then should the country be run?”

I must not vote on the basis of what is good for me.

  • If I am a pensioner, not just on the basis of which party promises to maintain pensions.
  • If I am a business person, not just on the basis of what is good for business.
  • If I am a worker, not just on the basis of workers rights, or minimum pay.
  • If I am disabled in some way, not just on the basis of which party offers the best protection.

Jesus talked about loving our neighbour as ourself. This is my responsibility. We cannot leave this to the state to do this for us, but having a vote means asking these questions:-

  • How would a party look after people who have spent all their lives contributing to society?
  • Which party would increase the prosperity of the country for all?
  • Which party would look after the rights of workers and make sure that their wages are sufficient to support their families?
  • Which party would support those with mental or physical disabilities who cannot get a normal job?

Jesus took this ‘loving thing’ even further when he said that we should love our enemies.  This surely cannot mean having weapons that can wreak terrible revenge on the civilians of an enemy country. So there is one more question.

  • Which party, (if any,) would not depend on weapons of mass destruction to defend our country?

Conclusion

On the basis of the above questions, it is very clear to me how I should vote.  It is up to each one of us to search our conscience and make our own choice. You may have other priorities and other questions but if you seek to be a follower of Jesus, I implore you to be sure that your vote is in line with the teachings of Jesus Christ.


The Inclusive Church

Christine and I recently visited a church in Manchester which describes itself as an inclusive church. It has set me thinking, and I really believe that Christian Churches should welcome anybody who comes to them and includes them at all levels regardless of race, gender, sexuality etc.

The church is not a club to be run for the benefit of its members, or those that ‘belong’. The church is there to serve the whole community in the name of Jesus Christ. Anybody and everybody should be welcome. It is not our job to say who is a true Christian and therefore can belong and become a part of ‘us’.

Continue reading “The Inclusive Church”

What a wonderful world

We live a truly wonderful world. I, as much as anybody, feel passionately and am very aware that in the world there is poverty, injustice, disease and corruption. But I still say that the world we live in is beautiful and full of hope for a brighter tomorrow. Why am I so optimistic about the future?

Continue reading “What a wonderful world”

Mary, Did you know?

This just has to be one of my favourite Christmas songs. Although it consists of rhetorical questions addressed to Jesus’ mother, Mary, it is really addressed to us, today. It is more about Jesus than Mary. Although it is related to Christmas, it is timeless and speaks to all the generations of Mankind. For me, it is, “George, did you know?” Continue reading “Mary, Did you know?”

Seeking Justice through Love

Justice and love are two sides of the same coin. We can seek justice through love.

  • Love means wanting the best for a person or group of people and acting accordingly.
  • Justice means wanting to eliminate those things which do harm to the person or group of people who we love.

In seeking justice I am not taking about legal punishment of those who steal from, act violently or oppress their fellow human beings but about seeking to change the system where injustice is encouraged or tolerated. Continue reading “Seeking Justice through Love”

Jesus and Politics

or, “How would Jesus vote?”

With a general election looming in the United Kingdom I am asking the question, “How, as a follower of Jesus should I vote?”  Does Jesus give us any clue how we should act in a democratic age?  Jesus said a lot about how we should order our lives, but very little about how we should go about choosing a politician or political party to rule over us.  But if we want to be true to following Jesus we need to look carefully at his life and words and see if we can glean some clues.

  • What are the cultural differences between Jesus’ day and today?
  • Was Jesus a nationalist?
  • Was Jesus a socialist?
  • Did Jesus believe in a free market?
  • How would Jesus vote? Continue reading “Jesus and Politics”

Optimism and the Kingdom of God

sun-and-wheatMy last blog was about nationalism and racism and how the future is effected by them. When we look at the world we could be very gloomy.  But basically I am an optimist because I believe the ultimate future is what Jesus called the Kingdom of God.

When Jesus taught us to pray in what is called “The Lord’s Prayer”, he says we should pray:

Your kingdom come,
your will be done,
on earth as it is in heaven. (Matthew 6:10 NIV)

When we use those words we are asking God to rule on the earth in the same way that his will is always done in heaven. In fact we are firstly asking God to rule in our own attitudes, words and actions. Then we are asking God to extend his rule over the whole of humanity. But the way God rules is very different from the way earthly dictators have power over the citizens of their country. Continue reading “Optimism and the Kingdom of God”

Following Jesus in the 21st Century

jesus-follow-meWhat does it mean to be a follower of Jesus in the 21st century? Is there a difference between being a Christian and a follower of Jesus? Do we have to reach a particular standard before we can be a disciple? How can we literally follow him when we can’t actually see him? Continue reading “Following Jesus in the 21st Century”

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